How Broadway celebrated VE Day in 1945

VE Day, Tuesday 8th May 1945, was celebrated by villagers with a parade down the High Street and a large bonfire and gathering on the village green which lasted through to the Wednesday evening.

George Keyte, retired village postman of Bibsworth Avenue, Broadway, supplied the celebrations with a couple of large barrels of cider which was given away free to revellers.

Special church services were held in all the churches and houses across the village were decorated with flags and bunting, with several floodlit after dark.

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Broadway History Society
8th May 2020

Next Talk Monday 16th March: Broadway’s Schools

The next meeting and talk hosted by Broadway History Society will take place on Monday 16th March 2020. Starting at 7pm in the Lifford Memorial Hall, Councillor Elizabeth Eyre will be giving an illustrated talk entitled Broadway’s Schools.

Elizabeth’s talk will cover the day to day running of the schools in Broadway including Broadway National School from its opening to its relocation on Lime Tree Avenue. Although there have been private schools in the village, Broadway’s village school, at The Old Schools, was the main centre of education from the mid 19th century1 until it closed on 22nd December 1914 and then new Broadway Council School2 on Lime Tree Avenue was opened on 12th January 1915.

All welcome. Non-members £3 on the door. Refreshments will be served before the talk.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

1. In 1855, when Sarah Ann Hedgecock was school mistress, there were 15 boy and 25 girl pupils enrolled at Broadway National School. From 1880, Horatio Kilwood was School Master with Miss Edith, Prince Mistress of the Infants and from 1883, William ‘Billy’ Timms who moved to Broadway Council School in 1915 with Miss Clements, Mistress of the Infants.
2. The building of the new Broadway Council School by Epsleys & Co, started on 16th March 1914. When the new school opened, on 12th January 1915, it could accommodate 170 pupils. The staff were: William Timms (Head), and teachers Miss Edith Timms, Miss Edith Neal and Miss Maud Colllins.

Next Talk Monday 17th February: A Builder In Broadway, Charles Edmund Steward

Charles E. Steward (1874-1954)

The next meeting and talk hosted by Broadway History Society will take place on Monday 17th February 2020. Starting at 7pm in the Lifford Memorial Hall, Committee Members Mary and Nigel Smith will be giving an illustrated talk entitled A Builder in Broadway, Charles Edmund Steward.

Charles Steward (1874-1954) was a Broadway Parish Councillor, Captain of Broadway Fire Brigade, and builder in the village and surrounding area between 1898 and 1954. Charles was instrumental in building many of the houses in Broadway we know today and Mary and Nigel’s talk will include some of the interesting building projects Charles and his firm, Steward & Co., worked on.

All welcome. Non-members £3 on the door. Refreshments will be served before the talk.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

Broadway: 1798 Register of Landowners

In 1692, during the reign of William III, a Land Tax was introduced by Parliament. It was the first, and for a long time, the only form of direct taxation in Great Britain (it was eventually abolished in 1963). The tax was levied on land and property, including personal property and salaries from public offices, and was collected from individuals, including wealthy landowners, tradesman and shopkeepers. In the 1690s the tax raised around £2 million which equated to around 35% of the national revenue.

The 1798 Land Tax Register drawn up during lists owners of land and/or occupiers by parish and the amount of tax owed. Owners of land valued under 20s were exonerated from the tax so do not appear in the register. The tax was calculated on a quota allocated to each parish which varied across the country. Additionally, land of the same acreage was not necessarily valued and taxed at the same amount with more productive land often assessed for more tax. The tax was set at 4s in the pound and in 1798 became a perpetual charge which could be redeemed by the landowner by payment of a lump sum equalling 15 years of tax.

The 1798 Register is most useful for identifying landownership and the register for the parish of Broadway1 in Worcestershire included the following landowners and their tenants:

Thomas Andrews
Isaac Averill2
Richard Averill – land occupied by Mr Moseley
Reverend Mr Baker – land occupied by Mr Dobbins
Mr Balinger
Francis Brooks
Richard Brown
Mr Bucknell – land occupied by Giles Stephens
Major Cotterill – land occupied by Mr Russell
Edward Cotterill – land occupied by Mr Lamley
Thomas Cotterill – land occupied by Richard Brown
The Right Hon. Earl of Coventry – land occupied by Mr Osborn
Mr Cowley – land occupied by Christopher Holmes
Reverend Mr Crawley – land occupied by Mr Holmes
Reverend Mr Davis
Ann Dunn
Mr Fisher – land occupied by Thomas Rastal
Thomas Fisher
Mr Gibbs
Mr Gould – land occupied by John Adkins
Mr J.H. Griffiths – land occupied by Isaac Averill
John Grinnell
Mr Grove – land occupied by John Newman
Mr Harris
Christopher Holmes
Mr Newman
Mr Perrin – land occupied by John Adkins
Mrs Perrin – Mr Brown
Thomas Phillipps3 – lands occupied by Thomas Smith, Robert Careless and John Grinnell
Mr Richardson
Michael Russell
Richard Russell
Bonner Shakle
Benjamin Smith
Executors of Thomas Smith – land occupied by Mr White
Mr Staite
Mrs Stephens – land occupied by Mr Collett
Mrs Ward – land occupied by Richard Davis
Stephen White
John Williams
Sir Edward Winnington4 – land occupied by Mr Brown
Reverend Mr Wyniatt5 – land occupied by Thomas Stowe

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

1. Source: The National Archives
2. Isaac Averill (1749-1826)
3. Sir Edward Winnington, 1st Baronet (1728-1791)
4. Thomas Phillipps, father of Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872)
5. Reverend Reginald Wyniatt (d.1819)

Next Meeting: Monday 20th January Russell House, Broadway, its People and History

Russell, House, Broadway History Society

Russell House, Broadway

The next meeting and talk hosted by Broadway History Society will take place on Monday 20th January 2020 in the Lifford Memorial Hall with an illustrated talk by Art Historian and former Director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Malcolm Rogers CBE, entitled Russell House, Broadway, its People and History. Malcolm’s talk will start at 7pm and refreshments will be served at the end of the meeting.

Russell House is a handsome Grade II listed Cotswold stone building on the green in Broadway with beautiful grounds. Built in 1791, the house has had a number of owners. One of whom was the American artist Frank Millet who moved with his family to Russell House in 1885. Millet, one of the Broadway Colony of Artists1, died in the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, and his wife, Lily Millet continued to live in Russell House until her death in 1932.

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

1. Broadway Arts Festival, held in the village biennially, celebrates Broadway’s artistic heritage of the world-famous colony of American artists, writers and musicians, who visited and worked in the village in the late 19th century.

St Michael’s Church Choir Supper Thursday 14th January 1892

Shortly after Reverend Francis A. Morgan was appointed Vicar of St Michael’s in 1887 (see below) he arranged a supper for members of the church choir. The Church Choir Supper was then held annually whilst he was Vicar.

The 5th Choir Supper took place on Thursday 14th January 1892 in the National Schoolroom. The Evesham Journal reported:

“About 30 sat down to a bountiful spread, which was served in the infants’ room, the Vicar being in the chair. Amongst those present were Mrs and Miss Pauline Morgan, Alderman Averill, Messrs H.T. Morgan, A. Wylde-Brown, W. Timms, A.R, Williams, W. Gill, W.H. Biles, A. Roberts, J.J. Bollard, M. Biles, G. Riseley, F. Stokes, G. Hunt etc. After the repast the Vicar, in the course of a few remarks, suggested that they might give a little bonus to the boys who stayed in the choir after they had passed through the standards. They now had a very good choir. There were some members to whom he felt he could not do anything but express his warmest thanks for the way in which they backed him up and he mentioned especially Mr Williams and Mr Gill. He passed on to speak of the necessity of their attending practice and service regularly, and in conclusion said they could do no better than re-elect Mr Gill leader of the choir. Mr Gill having acknowledged his re-appointment, the Vicar thanked him for again taking office and for his services in the past. Having chosen Walter Benn and Richard Foss as the two boys to look after the choir books he proposed the health of the organist thanking him for his work in connection with the choir. Mr W. Timms replied, and submitted in eulogistic terms the health of the Vicar. The Vicar in reply spoke of the great interest which Mrs Morgan and himself always took in the choir. Mr A.R. Williams said a few words on the importance of attending practice and said they were glad to welcome the Vicar back amongst them in restored health. Alderman Averill thought the choir might have a little trip during the summer, say down to Worcester where they could go to the Cathedral and hear the singing there. Worcester was one of the most completely restored cathedrals in England and he never found one in which the services were better rendered. Mrs Morgan also addressed a few words to the company and then an adjournment was made to the adjoining large room and a musical programme was gone through. Amongst those present at the concert were Viscount Lifford, Miss Caffin, the Misses Hensley, Mrs and Miss Clare-Balle, Miss Bedford, Miss Williams, Miss Morgan (West End), Misses Brick, the Misses Fridlington, Mrs Timms. Messrs H. Averill, G.M. Cook, Stanley (Snowshill), T. Gillett etc.”

Accompanied by Miss Morgan on the violin and on the piano by Mr H.T. Morgan, the programme included:

Good King Wenceslas – The Choir
Hybrias the Cretan – Mr S. Fleming
The Manger Throne and Wot cher – Mr M. Biles
We’ll all go a Hunting Today – Mr G. Riseley
Riding on top of an Omnibus – Mr T. Gillett
Billy Stutters – Mr J.J. Bollard
A Piano Waltz – Miss Clare-Balle
My Mother – Mr W. Timms
The Toreador – Mr S Fleming
He ought to have a Muzzle on – Mr Gill

The concert ended with all singing God Save the Queen.

Rev. Francis Augustine Morgan (1838-1921)

Francis Morgan was the second son of Rev. Samuel Francis and Mary Juliana Morgan of All Saints Church, Birmingham. He was baptised on 23rd August 1838 at All Saints Church, Birmingham, Warwickshire. Francis was educated at Wadham College, Oxford, receiving his BA in 1860 and MA 1863. He married Annie Bridget Harriet Rowlinson in Chepstow in 1865.

Francis was the first Vicar and and builder of St Paul’s Church, Bath (1869-1885) and then Vicar of Chepstow before moving to Broadway in 1887 with his wife Annie and two daughters, Charlotte and Pauline). Rev. Morgan retired to Somerset in 1910 and died, aged 83, on 10th November 1921. He is buried in Locksbrook Cemetery. Lower Weston near Bath, with his wife (see photo) who died the following year, aged  on 22nd December 1922.

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

Broadway Policeman Joseph Henry Yarnold (1860-1923)

Joseph Henry Yarnold

Joseph Henry Yarnold (credit: Fred Gegg, Evesham)

Broadway History Society has been sent the following biography of Joseph Henry Yarnold (1860-1923) by Yocker Yarnold and Ken Edwards. Joseph served with the police force in Broadway in charge of the village’s police station from 1887 to 1894.

Joseph Henry Yarnold was born on the 20th December 1860, in Kingswinford, Staffordshire, the son of Eliza Yarnold. Joseph, known as Henry or Harry, was initially brought up by John and Eliza Bint at Market Street, Kingswinford. Sometime after 1871, Joseph moved to live with his Yarnold relatives1 at Menithwood, Pensax, Worcestershire, where he was brought up alongside his many cousins.

After leaving school Joseph first found employment at the local Hollins Colliery2, however, having received a good education, aged 19,  he joined the police service as a Special Constable. By 1883 Joseph was serving as a full time officer and within a few weeks had been promoted to Constable at Evesham.

In March 1887 Joseph transferred to take charge of Broadway Police Station. During his time at Broadway Joseph met and married Eliza Jane Baskett, daughter of George Baskett the Sexton of the parish of Salford Priors, and they married at Salford Priors on the 20th February 1887. In January 1894 Joseph was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and after serving in Broadway for 7 years moved back to Evesham to the new Police Station in the town. Upon his promotion the village held a dinner in Joseph’s honour. The Evesham Standard on Saturday 20th January 1894 reported:

At the Lygon Arms, on Wednesday, a public dinner was given to present a testimonial to PC Yarnold, on the occasion of his departure to Evesham and his promotion to be Sergeant. Ald. Averill presided, and there were also present – Messrs A Drury, G M Cook, K Averill, A Williams, T Bayliss, R Johnston, J Brick, J W Wilson, B Burrows, H Preston, Haines &c. The Chairman read letters from the Vicar and Mr Pemberton, who expressed regret at being unable to attend. He said they had met to make Sergeant Yarnold a presentation, as a small recognition of his services in Broadway for the last seven years. They were all aware that the life of a police officer was by no means an easy one, and PC Yarnold came to Broadway in troublous times3, just after an election, but his conduct throughout was most satisfactory. All classes of people respected him, and would be sorry to lose him. The Chairman asked Sergeant Yarnold to accept the present, which was a beautiful marble clock, as a mark of appreciation from the Broadway people. Ald. Averill then proposed the health of Mr and Mrs Yarnold, which was cordially drunk. Sergt. Yarnold returned thanks for the way the toast had been received, and for the handsome present made to him. He was sure in after life he should never forget their kindness, and he hoped at the end of the next seven years to have proved himself as satisfactory in his new office. Other toasts were drunk, including the health of Mr Johnston, who had promoted the testimonial. Mr Johnston said he was sure he had never collected money with more pleasure. Sergeant Yarnold had been a splendid officer, and all had responded most generously to his appeal. Mr Averill proposed the health of Mr and Mrs Drury, which was very heartily drunk. Songs were given during the evening by Mr S Jarret, Ald. Averill, Messrs Smith, A Hunt, and others, and the proceedings concluded with the toast of “The Chairman”, which was heartily responded to.

Eight years later Joseph was again promoted to the rank of Inspector a position he held until his retirement in 1909. Joseph was held in high esteem by his colleagues, magistrates and solicitors and on his retirement he was presented with a gold watch by the magistrates at Evesham County Sessions. The watch bore the inscription: Presented to Inspector J H Yarnold on his leaving the Worcestershire Police Force by the Magistrates of the Petty Sessional Division and Borough of Eversham and their Clerk, in recognition of long and faithful service, June 1909.

During his police service Joseph received a merit badge for saving the life of a man who had been pulled out of the Avon river and presumed drowned. Joseph performed respiration on the man and he survived. Upon retirement, Joseph and Eliza went to live at Salford Priors. Following a short illness in May 1923 Joseph was admitted to Clent Nursing Home where he died, aged 63, on 23rd May 1923. His funeral took place at Salford Priors Church the following Thursday. Joseph’s wife Eliza outlived him by 24 years dying at Bream in Gloucestershire on the 21st December 1947, aged 83.

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

Notes:
1. The large Yarnold or Yarnall family had lived in the villages of Menithwood, Lindridge and Pensax for many generations, the men employed as agricultural labourers or coal miners.
2. Hollins Colliery was on the site of a farm of the same name, situated between Pensaz and Clows Top. Samson Yarnold (1860-1937), one of Joseph’s uncles, followed in his father’s footsteps, working at several of the small local Pensax pits. Samson became the owner of the Hollins coalmine in the 1890s and retired from coal mining, aged 70 in 1930.
3. In the late 1880s the country was in deep recession and unemployment and poverty, particularly in Broadway and the surrounding area, was high. However, an article aimed at attracting visitors to Broadway published in the local newspapers in August 1887, painted the village as a rural idyll.