Next Meeting: Monday 10th December 2018: Farmsteads and Buildings: Recording the past for the future

Next Meeting: Monday 10th December 2018: Farmsteads and Buildings: Recording the past for the future

Dr Alan Wadsworth

Dr Alan Wadsworth

Our next meeting and talk will take place on Monday 10th December in the Lifford Hall, Lower Green, Broadway, starting at 7pm. During the meeting Dr Alan Wadsworth will be giving an illustrated talk on  “Farmsteads and Buildings: Recording the past for the future”.

Farmsteads are very much part of the English landscape and this is particularly true in Worcestershire. However, there are enormous pressures on farming and historic farm buildings are being lost. In many cases they no longer meet the needs of modern agriculture and they are expensive to maintain so many are being converted to other sustainable uses or are simply falling down. Alan grew up on his family’s farm in Yorkshire and moved to Badsey 15 months ago from Wiltshire.  Having taken early retirement from a job in industry, he returned to his farming roots whilst in Wiltshire and was Project Leader of the Wiltshire Farmsteads Project from 2012-2016 recording details of farmsteads across the county.  On moving to Badsey he started a similar project in south-east Worcestershire and the Worcestershire Farmsteads Project officially got under way in April 2017 when funding was received from the British Agricultural History Society.
Refreshments and mince pies will be served at the end of the meeting. All welcome, non-members (£3 on the door).

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‘Spelling Bee’ Competitions in Broadway in the 1890s

‘Spelling bees’ or spelling contests are a great American tradition, however, as early as 1876 there were newspaper reports of ‘spelling bees’ across towns and villages in the United Kingdom.

In the 1890s regular ‘spelling bee’ competitions were held in the village of Broadway in Worcestershire. One such competition took place on Saturday 12th January 1892 during a meeting of the village’s Congregational Guild. Held in the British Schoolroom, Reverend S. Clarke, conducted the ‘spelling bee’ and members of the Guild were divided in to two classes. In class 1, eleven entered the competition and they were given 20 words that had appeared in a recent copy of the ‘The Daily News’1. Miss Ida Morris spelled the most words correctly and was awarded first prize. In class 2, there were  five competitors and the words were selected from the opening chapter of ‘Genesis’. The prize for that class was awarded to the winner, Mr Arthur William Folkes2.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

Notes:

  1. The Daily News, founded in 1846, is famous for its founding editor, Charles Dickens, who remained in the post for only 20 days but continued to write occasional columns for the paper.
  2. Arthur William Folkes (1871-1905) was born in Broadway, son of William Smith Folkes and Alice Folkes (nee Parker). He married  Rosina Ellen Frances in 1897 and died. aged 33, in 1905. His brother died in the First World War and is commemorated on the Broadway War Memorial (see Broadway Remembers).

 

 

Next Meeting: Monday 17th September ‘An Update on Broadway Station’

The next meeting of the Broadway History Society and the first of the 2018/19 Programme of Events, will take place on Monday 17th September with an illustrated talk by Richard Johnson from the GWSR. Richard will be updating us on Broadway Station which reopened in March.

The meeting will start promptly at 7pmand will take place in main hall in the Lifford Memorial Hall, Lower Green, Broadway. Refreshments will be served at the end of the meeting.

During the meeting Hon.Treasurer Mary Smith will be collecting subs for the 2018/19 year, £10 for individual membership and £15 for a couple (cheques payable to ‘Broadway History Society’).

Debbie Williamson

Meeting: Monday 17th October 2016 ‘Elgar’s Women’ with Jon Goldswain

Guest speaker, Jon Goldswain, a recipient of the Elgar Society Certificate of Merit, will give his second illustrated talk to members on ‘Elgar’s Women’ with excerpts, both orchestral and vocal, of Elgar’s music. Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934) was greatly influenced by the intensity of his relationships with women, and in particular four women: his mother, Ann née Greening; his wife, Caroline Alice née Roberts, whose poems Elgar set to music; Helen Weaver, a close friend and Elgar’s first fiancée who ended a nine month engagement in 1884, and his daughter, Carice who was born in 1890.

The talk starts at 7pm and will be held in the Community Room at The Court, Russell Square, Broadway. Refreshments will be served at the end of the meeting. Non-members welcome (£3 on the door).