One Hundred Year Ago: 8th September 1920

Afternoon Treat for the Children of Broadway

During the afternoon of Tuesday 8th September 1920, the annual treat given to the children attending Broadway Council Schools took place in the village. The children assembled at the schools, the Scouts leading the boys and the Girl Guides leading the girls. The children walked to church where a short service was held, led by Reverent F. Lambert, Minister of Broadway’s Congregational Church.

After the church service the children marched to the field at Top Farm, Bibsworth Lane, kindly lent by Mrs Wells , where tea was waiting for them. After tea the children participated in games until dusk.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

100 Years Ago Today: Auction of Land and Property in the Village

100 years ago today, during the afternoon of Tuesday 31st August 1920, an auction of Broadway land and property was held by E.G. Righton & Son in the Swan Hotel.

Lot 1 comprised a freehold stone cottage on the High Street along with a leasehold stone cottage, stabling, store rooms and walled garden, let to Miss Parker, Mrs Stanley and Mrs Diston at the rate of £19 per annum.

Lot 2 was Buckland Wood Farm with its stone house and various outbuilding comprising a slate roofed barn, 15.2 acres of pasture and a top field of 10 acres. The land was advertised as being “Capital Dairy Land” with good shooting. At the time it was let to Mr C.T. Scott, Master of Fox Hounds at the rate of £65 per annum.

Lot 3 comprised two fields of productive pasture (referenced as Nos 274 and 236 on the Ordnance Survey Map) known as Lower Battenhanger1 and Wheat Furlough totalling between 29 and 30 acres on the slope of the Cotswold hills above Broadway about half a mile from the centre of the village.

Lot 4 was advertised as a “Superior Pasture Field” of 22 acres called Battenhanger (ref. 275 on the OS Map and adjacent to Lot 3). The land had a water supply was leased to Mr Smith with a rent of £85 per annum.

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

Notes:

1. Lower Battenhanger, Wheat Furlough and Battenhanger are fields south of the High Street and east of the Snowshill Road. The 1923 Ordnance Survey Map of the village does not have field 236 recorded but field 235, adjacent to Lower Battenhanger is noted as being Wheat Furlough.

Today: The re-opening of the Gordon Russell Design Museum, Broadway

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Gordon Russell Design Museum, Russell Square, Broadway

Today, the Gordon Russell Design Museum, Russell Square, in Broadway, is reopening its doors after a period of closure. The Museum will only be open on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 11am-4pm. Visits must be pre-booked and tickets are available via the Museum’s website (https://gordon-russell-design-museum.arttickets.org.uk).

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Sir Sydney Gordon Russell (1892-1980)

The Gordon Russell Museum tells the story of the Gordon Russell furniture company, which was based in Broadway for over 60 years, and explores the influence and legacy of Gordon Russell’s designs on a broad spectrum of 20th century design.

The Museum has implemented new safety procedures to ensure visits are as safe and straightforward as possible, and visitors who pre-book will have the whole museum to themselves during their booked time slot.

Broadway Visitors in 1892

James Bettner Ludlow

James Bettner Ludlow (1859-1921)

From the mid 1880s, the rural idyll of Broadway became a popular destination for visitors from across the world. The Broadway Colony of artists, composers and writers, some of whom made Broadway their home, attracted a number of their friends from Europe and America to the village. Local newspapers regularly published lists of people who visited and stayed in the area at the time. The Evesham Journal reported in October 1892 that the following visitors had been staying in Broadway that summer:

Argyle Parade: Miss Murray (from London), Miss Paton (Wales), Mr Clutterbuck (Merioneth)

Cowley House, hosted by Mrs Righton: Mr & Mrs J.T. Morris and family1 (Ballinaboy House, Ireland)

The Green, Mrs Stanley: Mrs Harris and Mr Edward Harris (Windsor)

Ivy House, Mrs Holcroft: Miss Macpherson (Lichfield), Miss Davis (Bilston), Mr & Mrs Norton (Edgbaston)

The Low Farm, Miss Tennant: Major Corbett (Worcester)

J.W. Lill & Sons, Birmingham

The Lygon Arms Hotel, Charles Drury: Mr C Dixon, Mr H.M. Dixon, Miss Dora Dixon (Edgbaston), Mr Fred G. Clarke (Eastbourne), Mr. G.H.M. Morley (Birmingham), Mr J.W. Lill, Mr A. Lill, Mr D. Lill (Solihull), Monsieur Louis Saurin (Rue des Roses, Paris), Mr W.J. Gale2 (Toronto, Canada), Mr James Bettner Ludlow3 (New York), Mr & Mrs James Smith (Moseley, Birmingham), Mr & Mrs Lewis (Gloucester), Mr Joel Wainwright4 (Finchwood, Marple, Derbyshire), Mr & Mrs Schiefflein (New York), Mr J.H. Payne (Birmingham).

The Lygon Cottage, Charles Drury: Mr & Mrs John Baker and family (Pershore)

North Place Mrs John White: Mr & Mrs J.H. Bacon (Highgate)

North Street, Mrs C. Bunn: Mr Dyer (Cambridge)

Russell House Cottage: The Misses Barnard5

The Knapp Farm, Mrs S. Savage: Mr Peach (Straford-upon-Avon), Captain Henry Allfrey6 (Stratford)

The Swan Hotel, Mr J. Brick: Miss Maun (Bridgnorth) and Mr A. Maun (Shrewsbury), Mr F.W. Land (Leamington), Mr H. Jenkins, Mr C. Daniel, Mr W. Perrot (Bordesley)

 

Notes:

  1. The Morris family were Irish landed gentry who had inherited part of the estate of the Frenchs of Errislannan and they had a house in Ballinaboy, Co. Galway.
  2. J. W. Gale was a wholesale dealer in staple and fancy dry goods, woollens, tailors’ furnishings, and gents’ furnishings with premises at 24 and 26 Wellington Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Gale was the manufacturer of the celebrated “Gale Shirt Collars and Cuffs”.
  3. James Bettner Ludlow (1859-1921). James Ludlow was an expert on real estate law. Most of his time was employed in the management of the estate owned by himself and his sister, Annie, which embraced most of the water front of South Yonkers in New York.
  4. Joel Wainwright was a naturalist, author of ‘Memories of Marple’ and one of the publishers of The Strines Journal.
  5. Frederick Barnard’s daughters, Dorothy and Polly, served as the models for John Singer Sargent’s painting Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose which was painted in Broadway in the mid 1880s.
  6. Henry Allfrey was born on 9th September 1850. He was educated at Cheltenham College and entered the army in 1868, being gazetted Ensign on 19th May to the 2nd Battalion 60th Rifles. Promoted Lieutenant on 28th October 1871 and Captain on 29th September 1880. He saw service during the Zulu War. Captain Allfrey was the father of Lieutenant General Sir Charles Walter Allfrey, Commanding Officer of V Corps in North Africa and Italy 1942-44.

 

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

 

 

 

 

1724: Highwayman John Tawney Executed for Stage Coach Robbery in Broadway

Gloucester Castle keep: the old county gaol. Based on an 1819 work, from W. Andrew, ‘Old English Towns’, published 1909. Via Wikimedia Commons.

In August 1724, John Tawney, of Ampney Crucis, Gloucestershire, was executed in Over1 near Gloucester after being found guilty at the County Assizes of the charge of highway robbery on the London to Worcester coaching route above Broadway.

Born in Ampney Crucis to parents who were described as being “honest parents” who gave him “sufficient competency to begin the world with”, Tawney reportedly kept “wicked company”. Aged 30 at the time of his conviction, Tawney was married with four children.

At his trial in August 1724, Tawney admitted that he had in the previous two years been involved in several highway robberies including robbing 20 people going to Cirencester Fair. On the night he attacked the London Worcester Stage Coach, Tawney was accompanied by an accomplice called Stutley. Tawney admitted that they broke in to stables owned by Mr Lillington at Wotton-under-Edge to steal horses which they used to ride to the hill above Broadway where they attacked and robbed the occupants of the coach. Captain Bissel, who was on the coach, prevented Tawney and Stutley from making off with their bounty and they fled the scene.

Tawney was tracked down and was held at Gloucester Castle, which at the time served as the county gaol. Before Tawney was hanged at Over he was reported in the papers as  “being very sullen”. Before going to the gallows, Tawney allowed a Minister to pray with him and he was pressed by the Minister to reveal the whereabouts of his accomplice Stutley and another man he had mentioned during his trial but he refused to reveal their whereabouts.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

 

Notes:

  1. Prior to 1792, executions at Gloucester took place in the village of Over 2 miles from the city. The condemned were conveyed to the gallows in carts, sitting on their own coffins.

 

 

 

 

How Broadway celebrated VE Day in 1945

VE Day, Tuesday 8th May 1945, was celebrated by villagers with a parade down the High Street and a large bonfire and gathering on the village green which lasted through to the Wednesday evening.

George Keyte, retired village postman of Bibsworth Avenue, Broadway, supplied the celebrations with a couple of large barrels of cider which was given away free to revellers.

Special church services were held in all the churches and houses across the village were decorated with flags and bunting, with several floodlit after dark.

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Broadway History Society
8th May 2020

Next Talk Monday 16th March: Broadway’s Schools

The next meeting and talk hosted by Broadway History Society will take place on Monday 16th March 2020. Starting at 7pm in the Lifford Memorial Hall, Councillor Elizabeth Eyre will be giving an illustrated talk entitled Broadway’s Schools.

Elizabeth’s talk will cover the day to day running of the schools in Broadway including Broadway National School from its opening to its relocation on Lime Tree Avenue. Although there have been private schools in the village, Broadway’s village school, at The Old Schools, was the main centre of education from the mid 19th century1 until it closed on 22nd December 1914 and then new Broadway Council School2 on Lime Tree Avenue was opened on 12th January 1915.

All welcome. Non-members £3 on the door. Refreshments will be served before the talk.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

1. In 1855, when Sarah Ann Hedgecock was school mistress, there were 15 boy and 25 girl pupils enrolled at Broadway National School. From 1880, Horatio Kilwood was School Master with Miss Edith, Prince Mistress of the Infants and from 1883, William ‘Billy’ Timms who moved to Broadway Council School in 1915 with Miss Clements, Mistress of the Infants.
2. The building of the new Broadway Council School by Epsleys & Co, started on 16th March 1914. When the new school opened, on 12th January 1915, it could accommodate 170 pupils. The staff were: William Timms (Head), and teachers Miss Edith Timms, Miss Edith Neal and Miss Maud Colllins.

Next Talk Monday 17th February: A Builder In Broadway, Charles Edmund Steward

Charles E. Steward (1874-1954)

The next meeting and talk hosted by Broadway History Society will take place on Monday 17th February 2020. Starting at 7pm in the Lifford Memorial Hall, Committee Members Mary and Nigel Smith will be giving an illustrated talk entitled A Builder in Broadway, Charles Edmund Steward.

Charles Steward (1874-1954) was a Broadway Parish Councillor, Captain of Broadway Fire Brigade, and builder in the village and surrounding area between 1898 and 1954. Charles was instrumental in building many of the houses in Broadway we know today and Mary and Nigel’s talk will include some of the interesting building projects Charles and his firm, Steward & Co., worked on.

All welcome. Non-members £3 on the door. Refreshments will be served before the talk.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

Broadway Landowners in 1873

In 1873, the population of Worcestershire was 338,837 living in 69,988 houses across 242 parishes in the county. A census of landowners held that year records 5,796 people owning more than one acre of land, a total of 436,327 between them.

In Broadway the following landowners owning more than one acre of land, are recorded as:

Isaac Averill – 309 acres
Michael Bedford – 184 acres
Reverend Charles Smart Caffin – 33 acres
Robert Careless1 – 49 acres
Charles Drury – 42 acres
The Executors of W. Fisher – 32 acres
David Hawkes – 20 acres
Joseph W. Morris – 25 acres
Owen John Morris – 25 acres
Edward Phillipps – 42 acres
The Trustees of Broadway School – 76 acres
Edward Stanley – 43 acres
John Wilson Wilson – 550 acres

The above figures are taken from the Return of Owners of Land 1873.

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

1. Robert Careless (1841-1916)

Broadway: 1798 Register of Landowners

In 1692, during the reign of William III, a Land Tax was introduced by Parliament. It was the first, and for a long time, the only form of direct taxation in Great Britain (it was eventually abolished in 1963). The tax was levied on land and property, including personal property and salaries from public offices, and was collected from individuals, including wealthy landowners, tradesman and shopkeepers. In the 1690s the tax raised around £2 million which equated to around 35% of the national revenue.

The 1798 Land Tax Register drawn up during lists owners of land and/or occupiers by parish and the amount of tax owed. Owners of land valued under 20s were exonerated from the tax so do not appear in the register. The tax was calculated on a quota allocated to each parish which varied across the country. Additionally, land of the same acreage was not necessarily valued and taxed at the same amount with more productive land often assessed for more tax. The tax was set at 4s in the pound and in 1798 became a perpetual charge which could be redeemed by the landowner by payment of a lump sum equalling 15 years of tax.

The 1798 Register is most useful for identifying landownership and the register for the parish of Broadway1 in Worcestershire included the following landowners and their tenants:

Thomas Andrews
Isaac Averill2
Richard Averill – land occupied by Mr Moseley
Reverend Mr Baker – land occupied by Mr Dobbins
Mr Balinger
Francis Brooks
Richard Brown
Mr Bucknell – land occupied by Giles Stephens
Major Cotterill – land occupied by Mr Russell
Edward Cotterill – land occupied by Mr Lamley
Thomas Cotterill – land occupied by Richard Brown
The Right Hon. Earl of Coventry – land occupied by Mr Osborn
Mr Cowley – land occupied by Christopher Holmes
Reverend Mr Crawley – land occupied by Mr Holmes
Reverend Mr Davis
Ann Dunn
Mr Fisher – land occupied by Thomas Rastal
Thomas Fisher
Mr Gibbs
Mr Gould – land occupied by John Adkins
Mr J.H. Griffiths – land occupied by Isaac Averill
John Grinnell
Mr Grove – land occupied by John Newman
Mr Harris
Christopher Holmes
Mr Newman
Mr Perrin – land occupied by John Adkins
Mrs Perrin – Mr Brown
Thomas Phillipps3 – lands occupied by Thomas Smith, Robert Careless and John Grinnell
Mr Richardson
Michael Russell
Richard Russell
Bonner Shakle
Benjamin Smith
Executors of Thomas Smith – land occupied by Mr White
Mr Staite
Mrs Stephens – land occupied by Mr Collett
Mrs Ward – land occupied by Richard Davis
Stephen White
John Williams
Sir Edward Winnington4 – land occupied by Mr Brown
Reverend Mr Wyniatt5 – land occupied by Thomas Stowe

Debbie Williamson
Broadway History Society

1. Source: The National Archives
2. Isaac Averill (1749-1826)
3. Sir Edward Winnington, 1st Baronet (1728-1791)
4. Thomas Phillipps, father of Sir Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872)
5. Reverend Reginald Wyniatt (d.1819)